Could U.S. Military Mechanics Hold the Keys to Finding Missing Contractor?

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  • Posted on: 21 April 2008
  • By: ePluribus Media

On October 9, 2003, civilian contractor Kirk von Ackermann left a meeting at FOB Pacesetter near Balad, Iraq. His vehicle was found later that day abandoned in the Jabal Hamrin mountains, roughly 140 miles away with no sign of struggle and $40,000 in cash on the backseat.

ePluribus Media researcher and editor Susie Dow strings together the events of the last day of Kirk von Ackermann's known existence on earth.

And things just don't add up.

Read her article, Could U.S. Military Mechanics Hold the Keys to Finding Missing Contractor? on the ePluribus Media Journal, see her conclusions and come back here to discuss.

Comments

Your connecting of the dots is just amazing work!

I hope that some information turns up from your research and reporting.

It's been 4 and half years. I just hope some one, some where remembers a small detail. I'm just certain Kirk von Ackermann sought to fix his tire.

I hope the military decides to provide more information some day. I know it is a long shot but maybe some day.

I have to check my list but I think there are 6-8 still outstanding. I'm expecting responses in June, which hopefully will provide some follow up to this article.

as it has been since you first published:

. . his laptop computer, $40,000 in cash in a case on the back seat, and his satellite phone . .

Are one of the reasons I believe von Ackermann was abducted and killed elsewhere and that his car was simply dumped where it was found. I think the person(s) responsible left the items in the car so as to have little to no connection to where they actually abducted him from. And it's worked. As far as I know, the assumption has always been Kirk von Ackermann went missing from where his car was found.

It's hard to imagine criminals walking away from $40,000 in cash. Either they didn't know or they were afraid of getting caught. Then again, murderers aren't always thieves.

Thanks for putting this together for us. I really appreciate this kind of work.

Best,

Jeff

Commander Jeff Huber, U.S. Navy (Retired) writes from Virginia Beach, Virginia. Read his commentaries at Pen and Sword, ePluribus and

Commander Jeff Huber, U.S. Navy (Retired) writes from Virginia Beach, Virginia. Read his commentaries at Pen and Sword, ePluribus and

Much appreciated. Know any military mechanics you can pass the article along to? ;)

Your story on the Journal has been picked up by Raw Story and WhatReallyHappened.

Hope that the request for information gets out there and people with real data respond.

Somebody passes it along to a buddy who was at Pacesetter, who knew a mechanic there, who remembers directing von Ackermann to an old friend from home at Anaconda. And the guard at the Anaconda gate, he happens to remember the Nissan Patrol pulling up to the gate and asking for directions, because his name was Kirk Akers...which is kinda like Kirk von Ackermann...

I have an active imagination.

But I also remain optimistic.

Susie, a quick check indicates that your article has had @ 2000 readers in the past 24 or so hours.