volcanoes

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Earthquake, Tsunami, and now a Volcano

  • Posted on: 13 March 2011
  • By: GreyHawk

Crikes - it's been one hell of week for Japan. Now, Shinmoedake volcano on the southern island of Kyushu has started erupting:

Hundreds of people were forced to flee when the Shinmoedake volcano on the southern island of Kyushu began spewing ash and boulders.

The explosion from the eruption could be heard miles away and an ash plume extended two miles into the sky.
[Read more]

Located 950 miles or so from the epicenter of the quake, experts are uncertain if the volcano's activity is tied to the recent quake.

Sorry for the short diary - but wanted folks to have something to add to if following relief and recovery efforts in Japan. There is nothing below the fold.

Side note: Something called 'volcano monitoring' was used by experts in recent weeks, who noted increased activity and lava buildup.

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Friday Morning Open Thread: Monster Machine, Samsung SSD Edition

  • Posted on: 11 February 2011
  • By: GreyHawk

This is bloody awesome. I want one.

(Well, ok -- I want five.) Hat-tip to Devon in Acton for the heads-up.

So, what's your idea of a "monster machine"? And do you have it, or is it a pipe dream?

On an oddly related note1, this sucks. (Technically, as has been pointed out, it blows. Whatever.

Icelandic volcano 'set to erupt'

Scientists in Iceland are warning that another volcano looks set to erupt and threatening to spew-out a pall of dust that would dwarf last year's event.

[...click for full article...]

...the only thing that would suck more is to be Bobby Jindal and to have his comment about "something called volcano monitoring" thrown back in his face...again.

 

See our prior piece for a related story on last year's Icelandic eruption.

Whatever else you may do today, keep in mind: this is an Open Thread.

 

1 Oddly related because it was a thread about the volcano that led to my digging out the video about the monster machine created with 24 SSD drives. Go figure. :)

 

Eyjafjallajokull Ash (Gesundheit!)

  • Posted on: 19 April 2010
  • By: GreyHawk

Bumped and promoted. Originally posted 2010-04-18 15:09:19 -0400. The "another 24 hours" mentioned in the original posting is now nearly upon us, so expect updates later on the travel restrictions. -- GH

The impact of the ash spewed forth from the Eyjafjallajokull volcano continues to impede travel across northern Europe. According to David Brown and David Byers of the Times Online:

Most of northern Europe will remain a no-fly zone for at least another 24 hours, the Government confirmed tonight, as it emerged that the Royal Navy could be used to help bring stranded people home.

That's one heckuva geological sneeze, but the last eruption of the volcano lasted two years (1821 to 1823). Volcanic eruptions can have even more devastating effects on global climate than any other type of natural phenomena. Quoting USA Today,

Saturday Afternoon Open Thread: Flying the Friendly Skies, Volcanic Ash Edition

  • Posted on: 17 April 2010
  • By: Open Thread

Via Reuters:

European air disruption worsens: Eurocontrol
BRUSSELS
Sat Apr 17, 2010 11:31am EDT

(Reuters) - Disruption of air traffic because of the spread of volcanic ash from Iceland worsened on Saturday with no landings or takeoffs possible for civilian aircraft in most of northern and central Europe.

[...click for full story...]

Air travel over a large swath of Europe is disrupted as a result of the airborne ash. Over here in New England, skies are cloudy and kinda rainy.

What's up in your neck of the woods?

This is an Open Thread.

Okmok: Kiss the Sky

  • Posted on: 13 July 2008
  • By: rba

Rachael D'Oro/AP: Remote Alaska volcano erupts, spewing rock and ash

ANCHORAGE, Alaska - A volcano erupted Saturday with little warning on a remote island in Alaska, sending residents of a nearby ranch fleeing from falling ash and volcanic rock. .. The Okmok Caldera erupted late Saturday morning, just hours after seismologists at the Alaska Volcano Center began detecting a series of small tremors. .. The explosion flung an ash cloud at least 50,000 feet high, said geophysicist Steve McNutt.

Updates, location maps, background, and images (including the above) @ Alaska Volcano Observatory/USGS.