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Book Marketing: Participation 101

  • Posted on: 23 August 2011
  • By: GreyHawk

Crossposted from Daily Kos.

As many of you know, Shadan7 and I co-authored a book called Her Final Year: A Care-Giving Memoir along with our wives. It contained many excerpts and elements of the care-giving process as we'd related it here in addition to a great deal more information taken from various & sundry other sources (emails to family, online LiveJournal posts, other blog posts and personal journal entries). After writing the book, we then had to figure out how to get it to market: the traditional way (find an agent or publisher via query letter) or the "new" traditional way (self-publishing, utilizing some form of e-book and/or POD publisher). Here's a brief overview of what we have done to date, the decision process involved and our current status.

In addition, we've also got a way for those of you who'd like to get a free copy of the book to take a shot at winning a copy for yourself and a friend.

Follow me over the squiggly thing for more information.

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Writing for Yourself

  • Posted on: 22 June 2011
  • By: Aaron Barlow

The other day, when I should have been doing something else, I Googled myself.  One of the pages I found was on Writing Skills for a site called Paper Due.  At first, I was flattered, thinking someone was actually using something I had written to aid others in developing their prose style.

Then I was, well, "horrified" would be too strong a word.  "Bemused," perhaps too weak.  Anyway, I realized that the site is selling papers on the topic of "writing skills."  Potential writing teachers can buy them, using them to satisfy their own teachers that they know a little about what they might, one day, be doing.

Except, of course, they won't.

Her Final Year: A Memoir

  • Posted on: 9 March 2011
  • By: GreyHawk

It's now official. My co-author Shadan7 and I, along with our wives, have decided to self-publish our book about our experiences caring for our respective mothers-in-law as they slowly succumbed to Alzheimer's Disease.

The book's title is Her Final Year. Why that title? Because it fits - in several ways. Particularly if you regard the "year" as a metaphor. I'll excerpt from the link above, as Shadan7's explanation for the metaphor sums it up nicely:

The idea for the book – the metaphor, if you will – is that you can consider Alzheimer's progression and impact on a life as something of a whole. Just as the seasons progress, just as the days and weeks and months follow one after another in a fairly seamless manner through the course of a year, so does the disease advance. January starts with hope for a new year, in December you're looking back at how things actually unfolded. You can predict, in general terms, what the weather will be like from month to month – but you can still have a glorious sunny day the week of Christmas, just as you can have a grim and cold weekend in September.

Likewise, someone suffering from dementia can have good days and bad days, even as the general trend of the disease moves relentlessly on to a known conclusion. Furthermore, in no two people will the disease progress in exactly the same way.

Therefore, in order to make our book the most useful to other people, we've arranged the "months" according to the general progression of the disease, and then we've placed individual entries – drawn from email correspondence, blog posts and Live Journal entries – into the "month" where it most seems to fit. There is a general tendency for those entries to follow an actual chronological progression, but it happens that sometimes they don't match up that way. In addition, things are time-compressed: the actual experiences we’re relating happened over roughly four years, but in order to make the most sense of them they've been fit into this one-year framework.

Hence, Her Final Year. Incidentally, the last third or so of the book is a whole other section titled His First Year, dealing with the impact of the caregiving and subsequent recovery from it.

 

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Honey, Put Down Your Flamethrower, You Know I've Always Loved You

  • Posted on: 10 March 2009
  • By: supak

That's the last line from a Lawrence Raab poem I love, Attack of the Crab Monsters.

I'm a poet. I went about 10 years between poems, having just finished one recently. I'm not really sure why that gap yawns across the last decade. I could say it's because we've been raising two kids, working our asses off, watching in disbelief as George Bush took this country down a few notches, losing everything due to my disability, and starting all over out here in Rural upstate New York. But it's really because I just didn't have much to say.

A Loosing Battle

  • Posted on: 24 September 2008
  • By: Aaron Barlow

OK, all of us create typos, misplace punctuation (or omit it), and spell certain works idiosyncratically. Let's face it: the "rules" of English do little to assist us and much to maintain confusion. Still, we shouldn't abet the loss of specificity and function (let alone meaning) of written English. Especially not if we work for The New York Times. Especially not if we are op-ed columnists. Especially not if we have considerable writing skills of our own and access to the best editorial apparatus in the country.