Thieves Guild: Bank of America Flubs Foreclosure, Seizes Wrong House -- AGAIN

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  • Posted on: 17 January 2010
  • By: GreyHawk

Hat-tip Consumerist.

For some, the slogan "practice makes perfect" is a motto of encouragement to try again, try harder and achieve perfection. For Bank of America, it should be taken as a strong hint to try and do the right thing the first time, not to try and find a better way to seize the wrong house and then attempt to abstain from any recognizable responsibility.

It should be, but it's not.

BoA has apparently attempted to foreclose on the wrong house once again, according to an article by Laura Elder in the Galveston County Daily News:

GALVESTON — A West End property owner is suing Bank of America Corp., asserting its agents mistakenly seized a vacation house he owns free and clear, then changed the locks and shut the power off, resulting in the smelly spoiling of about 75 pounds of salmon and halibut from an Alaska fishing trip and other damages.

[...snip...]

Agents working for Bank of America cut off power to the property by turning off the main switch in the lower part of the house, according to the lawsuit. They also changed the locks, so Schroit was unable to reach the switch to turn the power back on, according to the lawsuit.

[...snip...]

"The property sustained water damage, potential mold contamination arising from the standing freezer residue, water, heat and high humidity conditions during the time the electrical power was off," according to the lawsuit.

This marks the second time known this has known to occur. The Wheelright, Ky, homeowner in that incident filed a lawsuit against the bank for a similar incident: the locks were changed, and the bank refused to pay any damages other than replacement locks.

Accidents happen, but the bank's responsibility for its actions doesn't cease to exist simply because it's a corporate behemoth. If an average person had "accidentally" shut off power to someone else's home, changed the locks and caused untold damage, that person would be held liable in both criminal and civil court for the actions -- amends and liability would most certainly be assigned.

Bank of America's incapacity to deal responsibly with "errors" that significantly impact the public should be a wake-up call that the bank has other serious issues that need to be addressed, and that the rights and liberties of "corporate personhood" should not ever exceed the rights and liberties of real living people.

Comments

I wonder how members of the Bank of America board of directors would feel if they came home to same the sort of situation....where's a mischievious teenager when you need one.....

If the same thing happened to any BoA execs, there'd be hell to pay.

Or if any average person broke into a house, had the locks changed and power shut off, that'd be malicious mischief and possibly vandalism on top of a breaking and entering charge...and then there's the potential lawsuit for damages on top of the criminal charges.