corporate media

Michael Collins: The Budget Betrayal - Questions and Answers

This president will never do a single thing to oppose the the agenda of the ruling financial elite unless, of course, members of the ruling elite tell him to oppose something meaningless just for the sake of appearances.

Question: Why did President Obama put Social Security and Medicare on the table in the budget negotiations when 80% of the people oppose cuts to these programs?

Answer: The president is not in office to represent those people. He was selected, funded and carried over the finish line by corporate America. Look at the appointment of Wall Streeter Timothy Geithner, the bailouts, and the failure to prosecute any of the crooks who caused the current recession. He's serving the people who put him in office. Those people don't need Social Security and Medicare.

Suppressing the Truth About Nuclear Power - If you think this was bad, just wait

By Joaquin posted by Michael Collins

The truth is, there is a big fat lie that the nuclear power industry and the media are foisting on the public and that has not changed. But first let's take a look at some other lies. For example, here is a picture of an exploding reactor building #3 at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant: (Image)

We are supposed to believe that this hydrogen explosion is no biggie; course it isn't; it's just a direct hit. WTF, there is a huge amount of concrete flying hundreds of meters in the air not a tin roof; the nature of the damage done by this explosion has proven to be the subject of one lie after another.

The Buzz on Synergy and the New Media Conglomerate

Over the years we have seen that a massive concentration of corporations and media synergy has been on the rise as a marketing tool:

Synergy in the media

In media economics, synergy is the promotion and sale of a product
(and all its versions) throughout the various subsidiaries of a media conglomerate, e.g.: films, soundtracks or video games. Walt Disney pioneered synergistic marketing techniques in the 1930s by granting dozens of firms the right to use his Mickey Mouse
character in products and ads, and continued to market Disney media through licensing arrangements. These products can help advertise the film itself and thus help to increase the film's sales. For example, the Spider-Man films had toys of webshooters and figures of the characters made, as well as posters and games.

Even the lefts' more trusted corporate owned news sources are almost always, to a degree, caught up in some conflicts of interests because of Media conglomerates that can be damaging to the public good:

Critics have accused the larger conglomerates of dominating media, especially news, and refusing to publicize or deem "newsworthy" information that would be harmful to their other interests, and of contributing to the merging of entertainment and news (sensationalism) at the expense of tough coverage of serious issues. They are also accused of being a leading force for the standardization of culture (see globalization, Americanization), and they are a frequent target of criticism by partisan political groups which often perceive the news productions biased toward their foes.

In response, the companies and their supporters state that they maintain a strict separation between the business end and the production end of news departments.

Eventually the truth leaks out.

When Art and Reality collide ...

Originally posted Sat, 02/02/2008 - 13:27 - standingup

When Art and Reality collide ...
what wreckage will be left in its wake?

Screenwriter Paddy Chayefsky, a World War II veteran, and recipient of the Purple Heart, penned a movie script that has yet to its full impact.

That 1976 Movie: Network

at the time, it seemed more Satire, than Truth.

Ron Paul, Dennis Kucinich, the Corporate Media Debates and Presidential Politics in 2008

There are only two houses sporting presidential candidate lawnsigns in this small town of about 6000 residents.

Both signs are for Ron Paul.

One might assume that such tiny anecdotal evidence suggests a wide divide in the support for Paul and the other candidates -- with nary a lawnsign proclaiming support for any of the others, but you would be forgiven for not coming to that conclusion, especially if you made your assessment based on coverage in the main street media or as more and more people refer to it -- the corporate media.

The results from Iowa show Paul garnered 10% of the vote and came in fifth on the Republican side. But as Bill Moyers indicated in his interviews with Kathleen Jamieson (Director of the Anneberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania Anneberg School for Communication), Dennis Kucinich and Ron Paul, you would not be faulted for thinking that Paul and Kucinich had dropped out of the race for their respective parties' nominations.

The WSJ's Paul Steiger reflects on the News Biz and where it's headed

Paul Steiger, a 41 year newspaper veteran, packs his boxes at The Wall Street Journal and reflects on what is happening to the "news" Read All About It.

Many of us knocking around the ePluribus Media community for the past three years have been reflecting (in countless essays and articles) on how online organizations, like our own, impact news, news gathering, research, investigation and the big media organizations themselves. Just a couple of days ago, I posted some preliminary thoughts about The New London Day -- the "non-profit," independent newspaper I have been reading about recently.

It was startling then, to open today's weekend edition of The Wall Street Journal and see what Steiger suggests below the fold.