health care rationing

Do you deserve to die?

The Forgotten Question in the Health Care Debat


Rationed care.   Image

Do you deserve to die?

Do your friends and family?

Michael Collins

Scenario 1: You've just been diagnosed with a cancer of the lymphatic system.  You're told that it requires a procedure within the next two weeks.  Unfortunately, you were laid off from your corporate job 11 months, 30 days ago.  You are on your last day of COBRA.  Your company retirement and savings are all gone.  You can't afford the $1,200 a month premium needed to continue your coverage.  Without the operation, you will die.  Do you deserve to die?

Scenario 2: Your spouse has a long history of illness.  Then you discover she has a virulent infection that, if untreated, threatens to disable her to the point where she's immobile and requires 'round the clock medical care.  You work for yourself.  While you have catastrophic health insurance, it doesn't cover the needed treatment nor does it provide for nursing care.  Does your wife deserve to experience this untreated sickness and suffering until her premature death?

Nancy Snyderman's Fluffy Health Care News Show

Crossposted from DailyKos.

It yanks my chain whenever I see a show like MSNBC is putting on at noon Monday through Friday. Health care is at a tipping point, so what does MSNBC do? They put on fluff. She gets meaty guests, then flubs it. This interview with Tom Daschale is all broad strokes and no nitty gritty. She asks some tough questions, but lets Daschale skate without answering them.

Dr. Snyderman has been around tv for years. She was on ABC regularly. Now she's got her own spot on MSNBC at noon. The problem is she relies too much on her "authority" as an MD and she doesn't do what it takes to back up what she says.

Dr. Snyderman, trying to win an argument by saying, "Because I said so" or "I've read the research and it says I'm right on this" (without citing the source) doesn't do it for me. Take a page from Ross Perot's book and do the charts and show them to your audience. Cite your sources, don't use suspect sources. Spend less time grinding your ax and spend more time exploring ideas different than your own.