Invasion

The Hornet's Nest Kicked Back - A Review of Susan Lindauer's Extreme Prejudice

  • Posted on: 22 December 2010
  • By: MichaelCollins

Michael Collins

Fiction delivers justice that reality rarely approaches. Victims endure suffering and emerge as victors after overcoming incredible challenges. Stieg Larsson's gripping Millennium Trilogy weaves a story of revenge and triumphs for Lizbeth Salander, locked away in a mental institution and sexually abused for years. When Salander got out and threatened to go public about a high level sexual exploitation ring, the perpetrators sought to lock her up again. In the final installment, The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest, Salander found some justice. (Image)

Susan Lindauer's autobiography, Extreme Prejudice, tells a story with certain broad similarities. In her case, however, the hornet's nest kicked back with a real vengeance. After over a decade as a U.S intelligence asset, Lindauer was privy to information about pre war Iraq that threatened to serve up a huge embarrassment to the Bush-Cheney regime. She hand delivered a letter to senior Bush administration officials in hopes of averting what she predicted would be the inevitably tragic 2003 US invasion of Iraq. Those officials, unnamed in the indictment, were her second cousin, then White House chief of staff Andy Card, and Colin Powell.

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Sundance Channel on Iraq: 6th Anniversary

  • Posted on: 15 March 2009
  • By: jimstaro

The Sundance Channel just launched a website in observance of the sixth anniversary of the U.S. invasion of Iraq.

 

From a post by Anna Brew, found at After Downing Street hattip for the lead:

The highlight of the site is a large collection of webisodes and clips from two documentaries that will premiere on television on March 19th (the date of the 2003 invasion): Hometown Baghdad and Heavy Metal in Baghdad. Both films capture the day-to-day realities confronted by Iraqi citizens.

 

"Peoples' Peace Treaty" - On This Day

  • Posted on: 24 November 2008
  • By: jimstaro

November 24, 1970

14 American students met with Vietnamese in Hanoi to plan the "Peoples' Peace Treaty" between the peoples of the United States, South Vietnam and North Vietnam.
It begins, "Be it known that the American people and the Vietnamese people are not enemies. The war is carried out in the names of the people of the United States and South Vietnam, but without our consent. It destroys the land and people of Vietnam. It drains America of its resources, its youth, and its honor."
The treaty was ultimately endorsed by millions.

“Changing Us”

  • Posted on: 6 July 2008
  • By: jimstaro

Counseling and medication weren’t enough to help Laef Fox recover from his grim war experience in Iraq, and drugs and alcohol didn’t work either, so he tried making a movie instead.

There's a new Documentary out, that was shown in a premeir private showing on July 4th in Denver.

As the quote above states it was made, with help, by Laef Fox an Iraq Conflict Veteran, with footage Fox shot while in Iraq.

Fox was in Iraq for six months starting in April 2003, just after the invasion began.

Iraq Getting Lonelier For U.S.

  • Posted on: 1 June 2008
  • By: jimstaro

There's someone who gets it:

Rudd has said the Iraq deployment has made Australia more of a target for terrorism.

Though the damage is already done, from the invasion and occupation, the hatreds intensified, new enemies established, Australia ends Iraq combat operations, after their five years of wrongly following the failed policies of the U.S. and joining the small contingent of the coalition of the willing.

Segregated Communities in Iraq

  • Posted on: 14 February 2008
  • By: jimstaro

May Spell Trouble

As Iraqis who fled their homes during the war begin to return, some are finding it safer to move into areas inhabited by other members of their sect, creating segregated communities of Shia and Sunni Muslims at ever-increasing rates.
The country has seen a drop in sectarian violence as a result, but some observers are concerned by the trend's other possible consequences.