Iraq War

U.S. District Judge Larry Burns approves forced medication for Tuscon shooting suspect Jared Lee Loughner

From the Overnight News Digest on Daily Kos:


Judge: Prison Can Forcibly Drug Tucson Suspect


Drug testingNPR

A judge ruled Wednesday that prison officials can forcibly give the Tucson shooting rampage suspect anti-psychotic drugs in a bid to make him mentally fit for trial.

U.S. District Judge Larry Burns' decision came after Jared Lee Loughner's attorneys filed an emergency request last week to prevent any forced medication of their client without approval from a judge. The judge said he did not want to second guess doctor's at the federal prison in Springfield, Mo., who determined that Jared Loughner was a danger.

Defense attorneys said Loughner had been forcibly medicated since June 21.

This ruling can set a dangerous precedent - one that was already avoided in another case which may be familiar to our readers: the story of Susan Lindauer, as told in Symbol Susan - "Thought this be madness..." as well as other pieces, several by guest contributor Michael Collins. In particular, check out Michael Collins: Did Justice Order Forced Psych Medication?. It's an eye-opener.

While I'm certainly no fan of Loughner, and I'd like to see a trial, the history behind forced medication - particularly in light of events tied to the Susan Lindauer prosecution/persectution - raises some troubling questions.

What's your take? Comments are open below the fold.

 

Nick Benton's Corner: When Teddy Took On His Own Party

by Nicholas Benton, owner/editor of the Falls Church News Press and posted with his permission.

>For as much as had been written and said about the remarkable legacy of the late Sen. Teddy Kennedy following his death last month, his willingness to take strong and principled stands against the leadership of his own party was among his most enduring contributions.

Tackling War Trauma

Promoted. -- GH

How to handle traumatic war events has famously ranged from Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address—exhorting survivors of fratricidal, in some cases suicidal Civil War battles to “resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain”—to General Patton slapping a soldier hospitalized for psychoneurosis, a term used in World War II for what is now called post-traumatic stress disorder.

Now we have a general screaming at soldiers back from multiple tours in Iraq and Afghanistan that they better not dare commit suicide. "It's bad for soldiers, it's bad for families, bad for your units, bad for this division and our army and our country and it's got to stop now. Suicides on Fort Campbell have to stop now," Brigadier General Stephen Townsend recently told 101st Airborne Division paratroops, according to news reports. Townsend is the commander at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, which “has recorded the highest rate of suicide in the army, with at least 11 confirmed or suspected suicides,” Agency France-Presse reported in May.

“Last year 128 soldiers took their lives, up from 115 in 2007, as tours of duty since 2001 have come ever more frequently and last longer. With 64 confirmed or suspected suicides so far this year, the army looks likely to surpass last year's record numbers,” the AFP report added. Why so many soldiers are killing themselves should be no mystery to military leaders. “Admiral Mike Mullen, the chairman of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff, has said he believes the suicides are tied to the repeated deployments that have put a strain on soldiers and their families.” Mullen has ordered the military to “look at ways to relieve that stress.”

But the macho posture of military culture hasn’t changed much since Patton slapped a soldier and called him a coward. “In a 2008 poll by the American Psychological Association (APA), 61 percent of servicemen and women said that asking for help to treat psychological problems would have a negative impact on their career, and 53 percent said it would decrease their status among their peers,” AFP noted.

While We Look At Prop 8, More Iraqi Gays Die

This morning I wrote a rather in-depth commentary about the continuing plight of LGBTs in the Middle East, in particular Iraq, where more Iraqi gays have been found murdered recently.


I waited until today to let most of the Prop 8 writeups and blogger op-eds dry up so this piece could surface in the LGBT blogosphere.


For those you have not followed any of the articles (few and far between), Network news coverage (little if any) in regards to one of the fallouts of the invasion of Iraq, this may come as quite an eye opener.

Confessions of a Madman -- that Cheney wants public?

Originally posted 2009-04-29 22:38:30 -0500. Promoted by carol.

Those extra 2 docs that "justify the policies of the past", that Cheney is so interested in, looks like one of them was already released.

I didn't believe the "A to Z" Confessions of the the "9/11 Mastermind" then. I'm not inclined to believe them now.

But you be the judge.

 

Obtained: Cheney’s Request Form Detailing The Two CIA Torture Docs He Wants
The Plum LineGreg Sargent's blog

Looks like Cheney may be after a doc that supposedly details what top Al Qaeda official Khalid Muhammad revealed under torture.

 http://theplumline.whorunsgov.com/torture/obtained-cheneys-request-detailing-the-two-cia-docs-he-wants/

 

Klalid M. wasn't he the dude, with the frumpy sleepware, and the wild hairdo?

 

Speaking Out

 

Two decades ago, Phil Donahue played a major role in helping end the Cold War by introducing American and Soviet citizens to each other in historic international television talk shows watched by tens of millions of people. Fired by MSNBC in February 2003 for being too antiwar on the eve of war in Iraq, Donahue has continued conducting his peacemaking talks with much smaller audiences.

 
“We have to stop it now. We have to stand up,” Donahue, 73, said at a recent community meeting in Teaneck, NJ attended by about 130 people. Donahue spent much of Friday evening with an overflow audience at a small art gallery in the Puffin Cultural Forum, as part of his grassroots campaign to show Americans his “riveting” (Fox News), “superb” (Time magazine), “heart-wrenching” (New York Times) documentary about a severely wounded, antiwar veteran of Iraq, titled Body of War. An award-winning documentary released in 2007, it was not widely shown in movie theaters, Donahue noted. His appearance and showing of the film were sponsored by the Bergen Peace and Justice Coalition and local chapters of Military Families Speak Out and Veterans for Peace as part of a week of actions marking the 6th anniversary of the war in Iraq.

Community Action on War Trauma

Originally posted Sun, 03/01/2009 - 00:57 - bumping - standingup

Many communities in the United States have a hidden problem, one that is in grave need of the American tradition of neighbors helping neighbors. The problem is the burden of memories that many young men and women bring home from a war, which can often become harder to deal with as time goes by.

Many veterans try to deal with war memories by trying to forget, by drinking or taking drugs. Some join veterans’ groups that offer comradeship and service programs. Yet an increasing number of veterans and active duty soldiers have felt nothing eased their anguish and committed suicide. Most veterans find ways to cope with life after war. But too often, when a veteran realizes he or she has a problem and seeks assistance from government agencies, they run into a bureaucratic logjam. Family members and friends often feel they don’t know where to turn to find a helpful program.

This is where community networking and community forums can play a vital role. Non-profit agencies may have counseling programs that are not widely known. Some advocacy groups have trained counselors to help navigate the mental health care system. Government agencies are trying to figure out how to do improved outreach to veterans, active duty troops and National Guard members.    

New Military Mission

Promoted. -- GH

With a fresh breeze sweeping through the White House, now’s the time for a new look at U.S. military operations overseas. In electing Barak Obama president, a majority of voters chose the “peace candidate” who pressed for winding down the war in Iraq. On the other hand, Obama also supported sending more troops to Afghanistan. Many close observers of the war in Central Asia are raising alarms about escalating military actions in a region of ancient feuds that are now flaming through nuclear-armed Pakistan.

 

“One lesson from Vietnam was that the United States should not go to war without broad public support. One lesson from Iraq might be that we should not go to war without a vigorous public debate in which an administration’s claims are carefully examined and challenged,” Ray Bonner, a veteran journalist in Asia, wrote in a recent New York Times review of two books about the Afghan war front. “Yet we are on the verge of significantly expanding the war in Afghanistan, which will inevitably affect Pakistan as well. Unfortunately, there has been little or no debate about President-elect Barack Obama’s plan to send in more troops.”

Not For The Weak Stomach - Reality of War!!

Salon has this up at their site and I'm sure we haven't heard the end of this incident, or like others maybe we have!!

The only way that doesn't happen is if You, the Citizens Of This Country, Make Sure It Gets Investigated and Indictments come down, not for the Soldiers but for those in Leadership, Top Down!!

Friendly fire in Iraq — and a coverup

Sources Said

originally posted 2008-08-25 13:45:45 -bumped -- cho

Where would journalists be without sources? While reporters get the bylines that win awards, their best sources often risk loss of a job. Reporters used to honor whistleblowers’ commitment by doing hard-hitting exposes. That relationship soured with the war in Iraq. Many sources these days are taking their stories straight to the public, because self-important journalists by and large ignore or belittle them.

That’s what’s happened with many whistleblowers who challenge the official version of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. With Bush apologists dominating television talk shows and newspaper op-ed pages, dissenters issue books and blogs to get past a virtual news censorship of informed criticism of the War on Terrorism. The infrequent exceptions to this pattern of the US media muzzling savvy watchdogs are stunning for being so rare.