discuss, debate, decide

Michael L. Connell

GOP Technology Powerhouse eMerges Behind Firewalls on the Hill

[Notice to Readers - 1/11/2009: Please check back soon for an update.  - luaptifer]

The world of Republican government IT solutions is changing as dramatically as the Party itself. 

The November 2008 rout of Republicans followed eight years of ever-expanding mismanagement of the Bush White House.   Few would have imagined the global magnitude of its fallout but trendsetters at two very competent top-tier GOP tech companies led the political technology market's new wave of consolidation by merging GovTech Solutions, L.L.C. (Richfield, Ohio) and GSL Solutions, Inc. (Tampa, Florida) just a month earlier. 

Already powerful among the GOP's network insiders, GovTech visionary Mike Connell was ready to rule when the newly minted HillTop Content Management System (CMS) would "create a dominating force on Capitol Hill".   But a horrible year for Republicans turned into Connell family tragedy when HillTop lost its architect and the GOP's Internet pioneer in a December 19 aviation accident.

Mike Connell: A Trail of Questions At the End of the Road

[ed. - bumped on preliminary NTSB report - luaptifer]

The crash of Michael Connell's single-engine Piper last Friday leaves a somber Christmas season ahead for his wife and four children and ends the career of an information technology pioneer.  Connell's expertise drove the Republican Party onto the infotech highway of the Internet era in time to seat the most famous of his three Bush clients in the country's top office.

His death should mark the beginning of a thorough examination of his political role inside the technology infrastructures that elected and that supported an Administration so widely recognized for politicizing the machine of Federal governance and justice.   

For the Bush dynasty's RNC, Connell embodied a paraphrase of his favorite place -- he ~was~ the cutting-edge, not just at it.  His partnership with the Party and its most powerful operatives (now known as DCI Group among other names) gave its political and corporate leaders the Internet edition of mass communication 'astroturfing' tools by which to engineer the consent of the public.

User login