piracy

Israel did not get all the video...

Nor did they get all of the photos. From Phoenix Woman:

Footage The IDF Didn't Steal: The Killings on the Mavi Marmara

As many of you know, the IDF did its best to try and keep the people on the Gaza Freedom Flotillas from being able to contact the outside world during the Israeli assaults on them.  Radio frequencies were jammed during the attack and all cameras, cellphones, computers -- anything that could have been used to record and/or transmit information -- were "confiscated" (read: stolen) from the passengers and crew by the IDF.

But they didn't get it all.

Just as chief correspondent Paul McGeough and the photographer Kate Geraghty of the Sydney Morning Herald hid some photos, Iara Lee managed to get some video past the Israeli dragnet, and showed an hour's worth of it today at the United Nations.

More [HERE].

Israel had better learn that piracy at sea, just another form of terrorism and like any other crime, does not pay.

Below the fold, Amy Goodman interviews journalist Iara Lee and has a snippet of some of the exclusive video footage from the attack, footage that has been made available to the UN and those investigating this attack:

A different perspective on downloading?

The following piece was originally posted by Peskydang of DelphiForums here. -- GH

Right now, the RIAA and the AMPTP are engaged in enormous battles with "pirates."

The RIAA will sue a college student for a million dollars if he or she has downloaded and shared 22 songs. Not because that college student has cost them a million dollars, but because they want to terrify and intimidate other college students into not sharing files.

Does it work?

No.

It creates resentment among the biggest target audience for the music. What it creates is not less piracy, but more.

What are pirates? The RIAA would have you believe that a pirate is a loathesome villain, the scum of the Earth, plundering the wealth of those who have fairly earned it.

But the historical view of a pirate is something else entirely. Pirates were not criminal gangs as much as they were front-line fighters in an economic war against the oppressive weight of an empire. Pirates are often economic freedom-fighters. The Somali pirates aren't pirates simply because there is an opportunity there -- they are pirates because they have no government to protect their fishing rights from foreign vessels or to keep other nations from dumping toxic waste in their waters. They are an ad hoc Somali navy, providing the only influx of capital into a starving nation available to that population. To the Somalis, the pirates are heroes.

But even if pirates were everything the RIAA and the AMPTP want you to believe they are -- villainous scum of the Earth -- the weapons that these organizations are using are the wrong weapons. They are using the weapons of law to fight a battle based on economics.

Blast from the Past: "The Pirates Aboard Our Ship of State"

On Saturday, 1 October 2006, I posted a piece in several locations entitled "The Pirates Aboard Our Ship of State."

We're now into May of 2008, and things have gone steadily downhill since then.

I thought it would be worth reprinting this, as-is, without adding in any of the newest outrages, new and continuing crimes or even the latest evidence of blatant disregard for the nation, the Constitution or the world we are building for our children.

So...onward.