Rosa Parks

When George done good: Celebrating Rosa Parks, and her work toward a more perfect union

I'm not a fan of George W. Bush or his two terms as President. He wasn't the primary culprit for those dark times, but he was - and remains - the figurehead.

But he, himself, was not the utter failure that his party and cronies were; he did some good. One example: his commemoration of Rosa Parks. To the Wiki:

On October 30, 2005, President George W. Bush issued a proclamation ordering that all flags on U.S. public areas both within the country and abroad be flown at half-staff on the day of Parks' funeral.

Metro Transit in King County, Washington placed posters and stickers dedicating the first forward-facing seat of all its buses in Parks' memory shortly after her death,[53] and the American Public Transportation Association declared December 1, 2005, the 50th anniversary of her arrest, to be a "National Transit Tribute to Rosa Parks Day".[54] On that anniversary, President George W. Bush signed Pub.L. 109-116 , directing that a statue of Parks be placed in the United States Capitol's National Statuary Hall. In signing the resolution directing the Joint Commission on the Library to do so, the President stated:

By placing her statue in the heart of the nation's Capitol, we commemorate her work for a more perfect union, and we commit ourselves to continue to struggle for justice for every American.[55]

Rosa Parks died of natural causes at the age of 92 on October 24, 2005, about 7:00 pm EDT; she lived in Detroit.

 

From Rosa Parks to Shelia Smoot: 90 yrs after the Civil War to today in Alabama (AL-07)

I was surprised to learn that an African American woman has NEVER been elected to a full term to represent the state of Alabama in the House of Representatives.

My goal today is to help change that.

When last I wrote about one of my heroes, Rosa Parks, it was to illustrate how the right would roll back the Civil Rights act to allow discrimination in the name of economic freedom.

145 years after the Civil War, much has changed, but more should change, until we truly achieve the Change We Can Believe In!.

In 2010, it is finally time to elect an African American woman to a full term in Congress to serve the State of Alabama in the House of Representatives!

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