HONORING THE FALLEN: US Military KIA, Iraq & Afghanistan/Pakistan – April 2009

Iraq, Rapidly becoming the Forgotten War!! There have been 4,603 coalition deaths -- 4,286 Americans, 2 Australians, 1 Azerbaijani, 179 Britons, 13 Bulgarians, 1 Czech, 7 Danes, 2 Dutch, 2 Estonians, 1 Fijian, 5 Georgians, 1 Hungarian, 33 Italians, 1 Kazakh, 1 Korean, 3 Latvian, 22 Poles, 3 Romanians, 5 Salvadoran, 4 Slovaks, 11 Spaniards, 2 Thai and 18 Ukrainians -- in the war in Iraq as of May 5 2009, according to a CNN count. { Graphical breakdown of casualties }. The list below is the names of the soldiers, Marines, airmen, sailors and Coast Guardsmen whose deaths have been reported by their country's governments. The list also includes seven employees of the U.S. Defense Department. At least 31,230 U.S. troops have been wounded in action, according to the Pentagon. View casualties in the war in Afghanistan.

 

Sgt. James R. McIlvaine 26 1st Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, 1st Marine Expeditionary Force Olney, Maryland Killed along with a sailor and another Marine while supporting combat operations in Falluja, Iraq, on April 30, 2009

Petty Officer 2nd Class Tyler J. Trahan 22 Explosive Ordnance Disposal Unit Twelve, deployed with an East Coast-based Navy SEAL team East Freetown, Massachusetts Killed along with two Marines while conducting combat operations in Falluja, Iraq, on April 30, 2009

Staff Sgt. Mark A. Wojciechowski 25 7th Engineer Support Battalion, 1st Marine Logistics Group, 1st Marine Expeditionary Force Cincinnati, Ohio Killed along with a sailor and another Marine while supporting combat operations in Falluja, Iraq, on April 30, 2009

Staff Sgt. Leroy O. Webster 28 3rd Battalion, 82nd Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division Sioux Falls, South Dakota Died after being shot while on a dismounted patrol near Kirkuk, Iraq, on April 25, 2009

Command Sgt. Maj. Benjamin Moore Jr. 43 2nd Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 3d Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division Waycross, Georgia Died of injuries sustained in a non-combat related incident at Contingency Operating Base Speicher, Iraq, on April 24, 2009

Cpl. Brad A. Davis 21 82nd Brigade Support Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division Garfield Heights, Ohio Died of wounds sustained when a roadside bomb detonated near his vehicle near Baghdad, Iraq, on April 22, 2009

Cpl. William C. Comstock 21 2nd Supply Battalion, Combat Logistics Regiment 25, 2nd Marine Logistics Group, 2nd Marine Expeditionary Force Van Buren, Arkansas Died as a result of a non-hostile incident in Anbar province, Iraq, on April 22, 2009

Lance Cpl. Ray A. Spencer II 20 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division Ridgecrest, California Died as a result of a non-hostile incident in Anbar province, Iraq, on April 16, 2009

Sgt. Raul Moncada 29 563rd Military Police Company, 91st Military Police Battalion, 10th Sustainment Brigade, 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry) Madera, California Died of wounds sustained when a roadside bomb exploded near his vehicle near Baghdad, Iraq, on April 13, 2009

Spc. Michael J. Anaya 23 2nd Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division Crestview, Florida Died when a roadside bomb exploded near his vehicle in Bayji, Iraq, on April 12, 2009

Sgt. Edward W. Forrest Jr. 25 1st Battalion, 67th Armor Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division St. Louis, Missouri One of five soldiers killed when their vehicle was struck by a suicide car bomb in Mosul, Iraq, on April 10, 2009

Pvt. Bryce E. Gautier 22 1st Battalion, 67th Armor Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division Cypress, California One of five soldiers killed when their vehicle was struck by a suicide car bomb in Mosul, Iraq, on April 10, 2009

Staff Sgt. Bryan E. Hall 32 1st Battalion, 67th Armor Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division Elk Grove, California One of five soldiers killed when their vehicle was struck by a suicide car bomb in Mosul, Iraq, on April 10, 2009

Sgt. Christopher D. Loza 24 1st Squadron, 124th Cavalry Regiment, 56th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 36th Infantry Division Abilene, Texas Died on April 10, 2009, at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C., of a non-combat related illness after becoming ill in Radwaniya, Iraq, on March, 17, 2009

Cpl. Jason G. Pautsch 20 1st Battalion, 67th Armor Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division Davenport, Iowa One of five soldiers killed when their vehicle was struck by a suicide car bomb in Mosul, Iraq, on April 10, 2009

Staff Sgt. Gary L. Woods Jr. 24 1st Battalion, 67th Armor Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division Lebanon Junction, Kentucky One of five soldiers killed when their vehicle was struck by a suicide car bomb in Mosul, Iraq, on April 10, 2009

Spc. Israel Candelaria Mejias 28 1st Battalion, 2nd Infantry Regiment in Task Force 3rd Battalion, 66th Armor Regiment, 172nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team San Lorenzo, Puerto Rico Died of wounds sustained when a mine detonated near him during combat operations near Baghdad, Iraq, on April 5, 2009

Sgt. Daniel J. Beard 24 147th Postal Company, 21st Theater Sustainment Command Buffalo, New York Died of non-combat related incident in Diwaniya, Iraq, on April 3, 2009

Lance Cpl. Stephen F. Dearmon 21 2nd Marine Logistics Group, 2nd Marine Expeditionary Force Crossville, Tennessee Died as a result of a non-hostile incident in Anbar province, Iraq, on April 3, 2009

Afghanistan - and The Third Front Pakistan!! There have been 1131 coalition deaths -- 678 Americans, 10 Australians, 153 Britons, 118 Canadians, 3 Czech, 21 Danes, 19 Dutch, 3 Estonians, 1 Finn, 25 French, 27 Germans, 2 Hungarian, 13 Italians, 1 Latvian, 1 Lithuanian, 4 Norwegians, 9 Poles, 2 Portuguese, 11 Romanians, 1 South Korean, 25 Spaniards, 2 Swedes -- in the war on terror as of May 5 2009, according to a CNN count. Below are the names of the soldiers, Marines, airmen and sailors whose deaths have been reported by their country's governments. The troops died in support of the U.S.-led Operation Enduring Freedom or were part of the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in Afghanistan. At least 2,807 U.S. personnel have been wounded in action, according to the Pentagon.

Lance Sgt. Tobie Fasfous 29 1st Battalion, Welsh Guards Bridgend, Wales Killed by an explosion during a foot patrol with the Afghan National Army near Forward Operating Base Keenan, northeast of Gereshk in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on April 28, 2009

Maj. Michelle Mendes 30 Intelligence officer attached to Joint Task Force Kandahar Wicklow, Ontario, Canada Mendes was found dead in her accommodation room at Kandahar Airfield on April 23, 2009

. Capt. Trond Petter Kolset 30 Norwegian Army Intelligence Service attached to PRT Meymaneh Steinkjer, Nord-Trondelag, Norway Killed when his convoy was attacked by a suicide bomber west of Mazar-e Sharif in Balkh province, Afghanistan, on April 17, 2009

Pfc. Richard A. Dewater 21 1st Battalion, 26th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division Topeka, Kansas Died of wounds sustained from a roadside bomb while on a dismounted patrol near Korengal Valley, Afghanistan, on April 15, 2009

Cpl. Francisco X. Aguila 35 82nd Sustainment Brigade, XVIII Airborne Corps Bayamon, Puerto Rico Died of injuries sustained from a non-combat related incident in Kabul, Afghanistan, on April 14, 2009

Cpl. Karine Blais 21 12e Régiment Blindé (12th Armoured Regiment), attached to 2nd Battalion, 22nd Royal Regiment Battle Group Les Méchins, Quebec, Canada Killed when her armored vehicle struck a roadside bomb in the Shah Wali Kowt district of Kandahar province, Afghanistan, on April 13, 2009

Airman 1st Class Jacob I. Ramsey 20 712th Air Support Operations Squadron, 3rd Air Support Operations Group Hesperia, California Died of injuries sustained from a non-combat related incident in Kabul, Afghanistan, on April 10, 2009

Lance Cpl. Blaise A. Oleski 22 3rd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, 2nd Marine Expeditionary Force Holland Patent, New York Died while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on April 8, 2009

Capt. Vasile-Iuliu Unguras 32 Batalionului 21 Manevra (21st Maneuver Battalion) Romania Killed when his Humvee struck a roadside bomb during a patrol mission on the A1 Highway between Kandahar and Kabul 12.4 miles (20 km) northeast of Qalat, Afghanistan, on April 7, 2009

Pvt. Azdin Chadli 20 42 Pantserinfanteriebataljon (42nd Armored Infantry Battalion) Uden, Netherlands Killed in a rocket attack on Camp Holland in Oruzgan province, Afghanistan, on April 6, 2009

Spc. Adam M. Kuligowski 21 Special Troops Battalion, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) Arlington, Virginia Died of injuries sustained from a non-combat related incident in Bagram, Afghanistan, on April 6, 2009

Staff Sgt. Phillip A Myers 30 48th Civil Engineer Squadron, 48th Mission Support Group, 48th Fighter Wing Hopewell, Virginia Died of wounds suffered from a roadside bomb near Helmand province, Afghanistan, on April 4, 2009

Capt. Petre Tiberius 33 Batalionul 1 Forte pentru Operatii Speciale (1st Special Operations Forces Battalion) Romania Died of wounds sustained when the rapid reaction task force he was leading came under fire about 50 miles (80 kilometers) south of Kabul, Afghanistan, on April 3, 2009

The Hidden Casualties Of War: Suicide

Military Suicides at a 30-Year High

 

Spike in army vet suicides calls for changes The dual wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have led to a variety of international and national glitches, many of which were predicted before the wars even began. However, one of the more unanticipated consequences has been a sharp increase in military suicides. John Violanti, a UB research professor and Vietnam War veteran, is currently preparing a study to change the way army veterans' mental health is examined. Violanti hopes that the U.S. Army will use the study's method on 3,600 soldiers returning from war in August, in order help to reduce and keep down the recent spike in suicides among the veterans..>>>>

 

Why do US soldiers commit suicide? The US military is grappling with a record number of soldier suicides. At least thirteen soldiers took their lives last month. That’s down from the twenty-four military suicides in January and eighteen in February, but still in line with the most number of suicides since record keeping began. As many as 143 soldiers reportedly took their own lives last year. ..........

Civilian Casulties - Iraq

Just Foreign Policy Issues Over a million {*1,320,110} Iraqis are estimated to have been killed as a result of the U.S.-led invasion and occupation. Learn More and Take Action» *Estimate, click for explaination

. To

John Hopkins School of Public Health { October 11, 2006 report } puts the count at 650,000, with a range from 400,000 to 900,000.

Exact Count of Civilian Casulties may never be known, as is the case in every conflict, especially an Invasion by another Country. For it is the Innocent Civilians and those Defending their Countries {of which All would be counted if this land were ever invaded} who suffer the most, during and long after!

Iraq Refugees UNHCR: UNHCR Global Appeal 2008-2009 - Iraq Situation Filetype: PDF (116k)

All the Deaths, Maimings and Destruction are the Blood on All Our Hands, No One can escape the Guilt!

March 2009***February 2009***January 2009***December 2008***November 2008***October 2008***September 2008***August 2008***July 2008***June 2008***May 2008***April 2008***March 2008***Febuary 2008***January 2008***December 2007***November 2007***October 2007***September 2007***August 2007***July 2007***June 2007***May 2007***April 2007***March 2007***Feb. 2007***Jan. 2007***2006***2005***2004***2003

The War in Iraq Costs, the rolling tabulation, over $666,245,000,000 and continually counting!

You can view other Honor Rolls of the Fallen I have posted on my site {links above}, or from the CNN link at top and the other sources that you might use or know about.

As Of April 6th 2009, There Are 92 Pages w/5 'Silent Honor Rolls' Each, Number Of Casulties Varies With Each 'Silent Honor Roll'; Many now have numbers in the teens and twenties, click on graphic.

 

97 percent of U.S. deaths in Iraq have occurred after George W. Bush declared an end to "major combat." ”Mission Accomplished!”

The Rand Corporation Terrorism Report the press release here, you can get the full document here or a summary of the research brief here

I'm Still Tortured by What I Saw in Iraq Matthew Alexander who is writing under a pseudonym for security reasons

 

I learned in Iraq that the No. 1 reason foreign fighters flocked there to fight were the abuses carried out at Abu Ghraib and Guantanamo. Our policy of torture was directly and swiftly recruiting fighters for al-Qaeda in Iraq. The large majority of suicide bombings in Iraq are still carried out by these foreigners. They are also involved in most of the attacks on U.S. and coalition forces in Iraq. It's no exaggeration to say that at least half of our losses and casualties in that country have come at the hands of foreigners who joined the fray because of our program of detainee abuse. The number of U.S. soldiers who have died because of our torture policy will never be definitively known, but it is fair to say that it is close to the number of lives lost on Sept. 11, 2001. How anyone can say that torture keeps Americans safe is beyond me -- unless you don't count American soldiers as Americans.

MSNBC Countdown Video Commentary

 

Americans, including officers like myself, must fight to protect our values not only from al-Qaeda but also from those within our own country who would erode them. Other interrogators are also speaking out, including some former members of the military, the FBI and the CIA who met last summer to condemn torture and have spoken before Congress -- at considerable personal risk. We're told that our only options are to persist in carrying out torture or to face another terrorist attack. But there truly is a better way to carry out interrogations -- and a way to get out of this false choice between torture and terror.

"How anyone can say that torture keeps Americans safe is beyond me -- unless you don't count American soldiers as Americans." Matthew Alexander who is writing under a pseudonym for security reasons

"Torture is the tool of the lazy, the stupid, and the pseudo-tough. It’s also perhaps the greatest recruiting tool that the terrorists have." Major General Paul Eaton

"If we'd been born where they were born and taught what they were taught, we would believe what they believe." A sign inside a church in Northern Ireland, explaining the origin of intolerance and hate

"Victory means exit strategy, and it's important for the president to explain to us what the exit strategy is," - George W. Bush, Texas Gov., 1999

"If ever forgetful of her past and present glory, she will cease to be the land of the free and the home of the brave." Francis Scott Key 1874

"Patriotism is proud of a country's virtues and eager to correct its deficiencies; it also acknowledges the legitimate patriotism of other countries, with their own specific virtues. The pride of nationalism, however, trumpets its country's virtues and denies its deficiencies, while it is contemptuous toward the virtues of other countries. It wants to be, and proclaims itself to be, 'the greatest,' but greatness is not required of a country; only goodness is." Sydney J. Harris

" What does it matter to the dead, the orphan, and the homeless whether the mad destruction is wrought under the name of totalitarianism or the holy name of liberty or democracy?" - Mohandas K. Gandhi

All over the place, from the popular culture to the propaganda system, there is constant pressure to make people feel that they are helpless, that the only role they can have is to ratify decisions and to consume. Noam Chomsky The Failed Policies will Haunt Us and the World for Decades!!

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