Thank You - A Sliver of Justice

Back in March of 2007, ePluribus Media published the first article in a three-part series which I wrote, Iraq, Contingency Contracting and the Defense Base Act. In part, the article highlighted the situation of the von Ackermann family and the lack of insurance benefits they received after Kirk von Ackermann, a civilian contractor, disappeared in Iraq in October of 2003. (Kirk von Ackermann is now the longest missing American in Iraq today.)

Von Ackermann's employer at the time, Ultra Services of Istanbul Turkey, did not carry Defense Base Act insurance, similar to workman's compensation for overseas contractors. The Defense Base Act pays benefits if a contractor is killed, injured or missing. Claims under the Defense Base Act are administered by the Department of Labor.

As a result of that series, an attorney retired from the Department of Labor contacted me with questions about the article and in particular, the plight of the von Ackermann family. I pointed him to the Missing in Iraq blog and as Megan has noted at her blog, he went on to eventually take on their case. 


It is my understanding that the attorney pursued benefits for the von Ackermann family under the War Hazards Compensation Act. The War Hazards Compensation Act is a component of the Defense Base Act but applies only to those killed, injured or missing due to the actions of hostile forces. The War Hazards Compensation Act reimburses by 100% all benefits. As the US Army CID had determined in 2006 that Kirk von Ackermann was abducted and killed by hostile forces, the claim falls clearly under the War Hazards Act.

In other words, even if Kirk von Ackermann's employer had secured Defense Base Act insurance as required, all benefits would have been reimbursed by the Federal Government any way, in effect rendering the middle man of an insurance company as moot.

While I don't know the details beyond what Megan von Ackermann has posted on her blog (see Yuliscious), just shortly before Christmas, a check arrived from the Department of Labor - over 6 years after Kirk von Ackermann disappeared in Iraq. The Department of Labor finally recognized her claim.

Without ePluribus Media, this sliver of justice might never have happened. So I'd like to take a moment to thank everyone at ePluribus Media, especially those who helped make the series possible.

Credits for those who worked on the article, proofreading, editing, fact checking, etc at ePluribus Media are: rba, newton snookers, cho, intranets, steven reich, greyhawk, wanderindiana, XicanoPwr, standingup, roxy

Additional Reading (chronological order)

Yuliscious
By Megan von Ackermann, Missing in Iraq, December 24, 2009

Defense Base Act vs War Hazards Compensation Act - overview with graphic
By Susie Dow, Missing Man, December 23, 2008

Book Review: The Curse of the al Dulaimi Hotel by Colin Freeman
By Susie Dow, ePluribus Media, August 18, 2008

Missing Contractor: US Military Mechanics May Hold the Keys
By Susie Dow, ePluribus Media, April 21, 2008

The Defense Base Act - insurance for contractors
By Susie Dow, Missing Man, April 6, 2007


Iraq, Contingency Contracting and the Defense Base Act
By Susie Dow, ePluribus Media, March 4, 2007


One Missing, One Dead: An Iraq Contractor in the Fog of War

by Susie Dow with Steven Reich, ePluribus Media, May 15, 2006



0
No votes yet

Comments

it tipped the balance of her year to GOOD! 

Of course, you wouldn't include yourself in that list, she who is the very reason that anyone knows anything about any of this, in the first place. 

Your investment has been long and caring so, just to be sure, congratulations to you among all of the ePluribus folks who contributed to the effort. 

Justice is pretty much the only thing this remote outpost can ever hope is returned on the effort.  It's a beautiful thing to know, thanks for the update :-)

-----
"I hope we shall crush in its birth the aristocracy of our moneyed corporations which dare already to challenge our government in a trial of strength, and bid defiance to the laws of our country." - Thomas Jefferson

"Can Blogging make a difference?"

Yes, yes it can. If you can change one person's mind along the way, convince one person to do something they might not have otherwise done, gotten one person to voice their opinion when they know they may be screaming into the wind sometimes, you have made a HUGE difference.

It is not the answer to everything. But it is a good place to start looking for the answers.

thanks :-)

-----
"I hope we shall crush in its birth the aristocracy of our moneyed corporations which dare already to challenge our government in a trial of strength, and bid defiance to the laws of our country." - Thomas Jefferson

privately, I had been thinking about giving up on Blogging as part of my activism. It always seems that at those times something has happened where even I have made a little difference somewhere or to someone out there. The tiniest of little victories. That is what has kept me going.

Build better nations.

Because we, the left Blogosphere as a whole, have so few chances to do this... I hope you don't mind me putting this up to crow about it a bit. :-) All of you involved in this one deserve a pat on the back.

Thanks for noting that here -- it's important, on several levels.