Heart of a Lion

Wild animals are not pets, and people should never ever ever ever forget that.

That said, there is a capacity for human/animal bonding -- an exceptional occasion where love and respect wins out -- that should not go unnoticed.

The flick below is of a woman and a lion who shared a very strong bond. The woman rescued the lion six years ago, when the King of Beasts was malnourished and in a bad way. They've been together every day since, even after the lion had recovered and she'd brought him to a local zoo.

Sweet, eh?

Nevertheless...Wild animals are not pets, and people should never ever ever ever forget that.

Over the flip, another video -- another example -- of a happy, playful lion and the incidental damage that it caused a martial arts practitioner during a magazine photo shoot...

Gitanjali Kolanad is a practitioner of the ancient Indian1 martial art Kalaripayat, which bases its movements on the effortless power of animals.

Kolanad has a small studio in Toronto, Canada, but the martial art harkens from Kerala, India; check out the full article from Desi-Life for more information.

The following incident occurred during a photo shoot at a local zoo:

For the third time, just in case people weren't paying attention: Wild animals are not pets, and people should never ever ever ever forget that.

Love can, and does, transcend many boundaries -- the first video is a wonderful example of that. The second is an important reminder that even when in a playful mood, it's very easy for people to be injured.

Let's be careful out there.

Hat-tip to Aurora of Delphi Forums for the tip to the top story.
_________________

Footnotes
_________________

  1. Indian as in "from India" -- the dot, not the feather, kind of Indian.
0
No votes yet