Previous Daily News Headlines

Daily News July 15, 2018

Daily News has the day off, so here is Roxy's Roundup of stuff that happened this week.

  • Trump went to NATO -- and embarrassed us.
  • Trump went to UK -- and embarassed us.
  • North Korea skipped the meeting where they were going to talk about returned the remains of US soldiers from the Korean War.
  • Robert Mueller handed down 12 more indictments (of Russians hacking the DNC).

All of these stories and more can be found in our Daily News Digest.

"Look, up in the sky! It's..."

Sure, the Baby Trump Blimp isn't likely to fly above the White House any time soon - airspace restrictions and all that - but, it can be fun to imagine the reaction.

 

Enjoy!

This Week's Headlines: 

Two Florida Republicans and possibly a third — Rep. Brian Mast — play starring roles in the indictment, although none is named.

Unlike President Donald Trump‘s former political adviser Roger Stone and political operative Aaron Nevins, Mast’s identity is the least certain of any of the Florida Republicans hinted at in the indictment. The indictment released Friday details how a dozen Russian military officers used an online persona called “Guccifer 2.0” to disseminate information they stole from the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and the Democratic National Committee, which was led at the time by Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-Fla.).

No doubt, the President will be excited to visit. After buying the property for more than sixty million dollars, he then spent a reported hundred and fifty million pounds—about two hundred million dollars total—remaking the site, adding a new course, rehabbing an old one, and fixing up the lodgings. It is possible, though, that he will have some harsh words for his staff. The Turnberry has been losing an astonishing amount of money, including twenty-three million dollars in 2016. The Trump Organization argued that these losses were the result of being closed for several months for repair. However, revenue for the months it was open were so low—about $1.5 million per month—that it is hard to understand how the property will ever become profitable, let alone so successful that it will pay back nearly three hundred million dollars in investment and losses.

Daily News Digest July 13, 2018

This Week's Headlines: 

Ireland on Thursday became the first country to divest from fossil fuels.

The country’s parliament passed a bill calling for Ireland’s $10.4 billion strategic investment fund to withdraw money invested in coal, oil and gas over the next five years, Reuters reported.

California's greenhouse gas emissions have reportedly fallen below 1990 levels, which means the state met its goal to reduce emissions years ahead of schedule. 

“California set the toughest emissions targets in the nation, tracked progress and delivered results,” Gov. Jerry Brown (D) said on Wednesday, according to The Associated Press.

Strzok, testifying at a joint hearing held by the House Judiciary and House Oversight committees, called Russian interference in the 2016 election a “grave attack on our democracy” that was “wildly successful” in “sowing discord in our nation and shaking faith” in American institutions.

“I have the utmost respect for Congress’ oversight role, but I truly believe that today’s hearing is just another victory notch in [Vladimir] Putin’s belt and another milestone in our enemies’ campaign to tear America apart,” Strzok said, referring to the Russian president.

Instead the comments are likely to stoke acute tension within Mrs. May’s Conservative Party, following the publication on Thursday of the government’s plan for exiting the bloc, which would keep Britain tied to European Union rules on goods and agricultural products.

Daily News Digest July 12, 2018

This Week's Headlines: 

President Trump assailed Germany on Wednesday and demanded that allies double their military spending targets, unleashing a broadside against NATO member countries just days ahead of his meeting with President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia.

But even as Mr. Trump raised questions about his commitment to NATO by lecturing European partners about leaning too heavily on the United States to protect them, he signed on to a summit declaration that emphasized strength and burden-sharing within the alliance and harshly criticized Russia for its annexation of Crimea.

But in an email sent this week to the nation’s 93 United States attorneys, Mr. Rosenstein asked each office to provide up to three federal prosecutors “who can make this important project a priority for the next several weeks.” Names were to be submitted to Mr. Rosenstein’s office by the end of Wednesday.

“I think it’s just stormy seas ahead for U.S.-German relations, and particularly Trump I think is using the visit to Brussels as an opening salvo in a potentially wider trade war with key members of the EU like Germany,” said Mark Simakovsky, a nonresident senior fellow at the Atlantic Council's Eurasia Center.

Almost 92 million eligible Americans did not vote in the 2016 presidential elections.1 In the 2014 midterm elections, an estimated 143 million eligible Americans failed to vote, marking the lowest voter participation in 72 years.2 For the nation’s democracy to function properly and for government to provide fair representation, all eligible Americans must have the opportunity to vote—and be encouraged to do so. Our collective self-rule is established and fostered through free, fair, accessible, and secure elections through which the voice of every eligible American is heard.

Special counsel Robert Mueller is asking a federal court in Virginia for 100 blank subpoenas in the case against former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort. 

The request was made in a filing on Wednesday. The subpoenas would require their recipients to testify in the U.S. District Court in Alexandria on July 25, when Manafort's trial in Virginia is set to begin.

Daily News Digest July 11, 2018

This Week's Headlines: 

Helena District Court Judge James Reynolds invalidated some of the signatures Green Party backers submitted to the secretary of state’s office, either because the signatures did not match those on file, because they did not match a registered voter or because of improper signature-gathering practices.

As a result, the Green Party did not meet statewide requirements that they submit a total of 5,000 valid signatures gathered across at least 34 of Montana’s 100 state House districts.

No one seriously claims that the amendment is invalid today; but every word, every part, and every effect of this most crucial of constitutional amendments has been fought over as bitterly as was the Bloody Angle at the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House.

Flynn’s legal team agreed Tuesday to delay preparing the report, which is used to determine the length of a sentence.

"General Flynn is eager to proceed with sentencing when that is possible," Flynn’s attorney, Robert Kelner, said, according to the Times. He added that Flynn wants to "bring an end to this chapter of his life."

The Martin Fire near the small Northern Nevada town of Paradise Valley erupted on July 05, 2018.  The cause of the fire is under investigation.  Between Thursday and today, July 09, 2018, the fire has exploded in size and updated mapping on Monday, has the fire just shy of 400,000 acres which is roughly 624 square miles.  Contained is low at 8 percent. 

Violence is growing in American ERs, fed by patient anger over their inability to get painkillers and rising health care bills, as well as the proliferation of gangs and untreated mental illness.

Daily News Digest July 10, 2018

Trump administration to miss deadline to reunite all children under five with families 

The US government has only managed to reunite two of 102 migrant children under the age of five with their families after they were separated at the southern border, and has admitted it will not be able to meet a federal district judge’s deadline for them all to be reunited by Tuesday.

In a hearing on Monday, the Department of Justice told Judge Dana Sabraw that it expects to reunite another 54 children by tomorrow’s 10pm deadline, which would leave approximately 46 children separated. 

This Week's Headlines: 

Noel Cintron, who is listed in public records as a registered Republican, sued the Trump Organization for about 3,300 hours of overtime that he says he worked in the past six years. He’s not allowed to sue for overtime prior to that due to the statute of limitations.

“In an utterly callous display of unwarranted privilege and entitlement and without even a minimal sense of noblesse oblige,” Trump and his businesses exploited the driver, Cintron says in the complaint.

While Trump rails at Harley-Davidson motorcycles for moving some production to Europe to dodge EU tariffs, the first daughter and senior White House adviser has never manufactured a single product for her Ivanka Trump brand on American soil.

Memphis police arrested Duran, who runs the Spanish language news site Memphis Noticias, on April 3 saying he refused to clear the street and presented a hazard. He, like other journalists, was covering a demonstration against ICE. Seconds before police showed up at the event, he is heard in the Noticias video coverage saying that sometimes undocumented immigrants who've committed no serious crime are arrested by police and then turned over to ICE.  The charges against Duran, also known as Manuel Duran Ortega, were dropped April 5, but ICE agents promptly arrested him outside the Shelby County Jail upon his release.

Eight boys have now been freed, while four remain inside the flooded Tham Luang Nang Non cave complex with their coach. They face their 17th night trapped on a ledge 4 kilometers (2.5 miles) inside the cave system.

Daily News Digest July 9, 2018

This Week's Headlines: 

The resolution said countries should limit the misleading marketing of breast milk substitutes, as a mother’s breast milk has been shown to be the healthiest for children in decades of research. The resolution was expected to pass easily, but U.S. delegates aimed to remove language that encouraged countries to “protect, promote and support breast-feeding” in an alleged alignment with baby formula manufacturers.

"Mr. Trump, #MeToo is alive and well. Keep your hands off Elizabeth Warren and every mother and her daughter," Allred said, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

"Republicans are holding four lottery tickets, and all of them are winners," Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) said on Fox News Sunday of President Trump's shortlist to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy.

“Sometimes things have to be torn down before they can be built back up,” said Representative Brian Higgins, Democrat of New York. “And I think we are in the tearing down phase, at least in the House.”

For Democrats, the loss in a primary last month of a popular lawmaker seen as a potential House speaker has injected fresh uncertainty into an inevitable and messy struggle over control of the caucus.

Daily News Digest July 8, 2018

This Week's Headlines: 

North Korea accused President Trump's administration of pushing for denuclearization with a “gangster-like mindset” on Saturday, hours after Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said his talks with officials have been “productive.”

North Korean state-run news agency KCNA released a statement saying the U.S. is “fatally mistaken” if officials believe the country would follow through with aggressive demands to denuclearize the Korean Peninsula.

The big picture: Five states — Louisiana, Georgia, South Carolina, New Jersey and Delaware — have no paper trails of votes. The other nine are in better shape, but still do not have all their counties’ machines spitting out a paper record.

Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) said that he doesn’t believe the United States's current sanctions against Russia are very effective after his recent trip to the country, adding officials should consider reworking the penalties to target Russian oligarchs.

“I think you'd be hard-pressed to say that sanctions against Russia are really working all that well,” Johnson told the Washington Examiner after his trip to country earlier this week.

Twitter has steeply increased the number of suspensions it’s dolling out amid criticism over harassment and fake accounts.

Twitter suspended over 70 million accounts in May and June, and has booted profiles at a similar pace so far this month, according to data obtained by The Washington Post.

A seventh former Ohio State University wrestler came forward Saturday with claims that Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio) knew about alleged sexual abuse taking place on the wrestling team while he was an assistant coach.

David Range told The Washington Post that Jordan must have know about the alleged sexual abuse by athletic doctor Richard Strauss because it happened regularly and was often discussed.

Daily News Digest July 7, 2018

Exclusive: US officials likely lost track of nearly 6,000 unaccompanied migrant kids

Federal officials acknowledged last month that nearly 1,500 unaccompanied minors arrived on the southern border alone without their parents and were placed with sponsors who did not keep in touch with federal officials, but those numbers were only a snapshot of a three- month period during the last fiscal year.

“There is a lot more,” said a field specialist who worked in the Office of Refugee Resettlement until earlier this year and was tasked with reaching out to sponsors and children to check on their well-being. “You can bet that the numbers are higher. It doesn’t really give you a real picture.”

 

This Week's Headlines: 

"The crooked press." "They are so dishonest." "Fake news." "Bad people."

President Trump went on another extended riff against the nation's news media on Thursday. It was startling partly because of its timing, one week after five employees were killed at a newspaper 30 miles from Washington. 

President Donald Trump’s trade war with China kicked off on Friday, when the United States started applying 25 percent in tariffs on $35 billion worth of Chinese imports and China fired back with taxes on the same amount of U.S. goods.

On Thursday, Trump said that he is willing to slap tariffs on up to $550 billion, which actually exceeds the current value of Chinese imports to the United States by $46 billion.

"The banks are not going to keep writing checks to save your farm," Matt Thiede, chief operating officer of Heeren brothers, a produce packing company in Comstock Park, Michigan, told NBC News. "For some family farms, one season could be the death of them."

White House chief of staff John Kelly told Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administrator Scott Pruitt that President Trump wanted him to step down before confirming his resignation on Thursday, Bloomberg reported Friday.

Sources told Bloomberg that Pruitt had no intention of resigning and was surprised and devastated by the request.

Daily News July 6, 2018

This Week's Headlines: 

On Thursday, President Trump showed no signs of backing down from his fight, saying aboard Air Force One that the first wave of tariffs on $34 billion in goods would quickly be followed by levies on another $16 billion of Chinese products. And Mr. Trump continued to threaten Beijing with escalating tariffs on as much as $450 billion worth of Chinese goods.

Mr. Trump was in Montana, he unabashedly told the crowd, to settle a political score with Senator Jon Tester, a Democrat who is tangled in a tough re-election campaign with Matt Rosendale, the state auditor. The president blamed Mr. Tester for the failed nomination of Dr. Ronny L. Jackson as head of the Veterans Affairs Department because he raised concerns about Dr. Jackson’s professional conduct.

“You are hammering on good guys in OPEC. You are actually discrediting them and undermining their sovereignty, we expect you to be more polite,” Kazempour said, according to Bloomberg.

Resources for the Future found that for every 2 to 4.5 coal mining jobs the plan protects, there would be 1 human death due to emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides over the next two years.

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